JAYME STONE 2 (WM-B-002)

Banjo Improvisation: A MASTERCLASS with Jayme Stone
90 Minutes
Tablature Enclosed

$24.95 USD

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jayme stone dvd

JAYME STONE 2 / ABOUT THE DVD

Explore improvisation with banjoist extraordinaire Jayme Stone on this groundbreaking instructional DVD from Woodhall Music. Learn to generate, expand and rouse up new musical ideas with a wide-ranging techniques, etudes and new approaches to the five-string banjo.

You’ll find: a comprehensive study of single-string style; a look at developing melodic, chromatic and arpeggio patterns; an in-depth exploration of the key of C; advanced techniques used by top bluegrass, newgrass and jazz musicians to add flair to their playing (slurs, triplets, rhythmic devices) and practical advice on how to use etudes, or studies, to integrate all of these ideas into your playing.

Jayme presents all of this material in the context of well-known traditional and original tunes including: Angeline the Baker, Salty Dog, Leather Britches (in two keys), Big Sciota, Garuda (from Jayme’s recent album The Utmost)

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JAYME STONE / ABOUT THE ARTIST

Jayme Stone is a rarity! A masterful banjoist, educator and a true musician’s musician. He has been a devoted student of music in all its forms, studying with the likes of banjo elders Béla Fleck, Tony Trischka and Bill Evans, as well as jazz musicians Bill Frisell and Dave Douglas. Teaching and touring across the continent, Jayme plays with the roots/jazz band Tricycle and the JAYME STONE Quartet.

"Bridging jazz, bluegrass and everything in between, with smart compositions, playful jams and a great sense of purpose."
CBC Radio

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JAYME STONE 2 / DVD REVIEWS

"The DVD fills a much needed improvisational niche in banjo instructional videos…and is well worth buying. Recommended."
Bluegrass Unlimited Magazine

"The material is cogently presented and well suited for intermediate to advanced players looking for guidance in improvisation."
The Bluegrass Blog

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